BLOG POST

by Kendal Rasnake
AUGUST 8, 2014

Bible Education as a Priority

One day at a congregation where I was attending a man came up to talk to me.  He wanted to know if I could help his young daughter with her math for school.  Two things may have come to my mind at some point after that.  First, if he knew my skills in math he probably would have never asked me.  Second, I realized that no one had ever approached me to ask to help tutor their children in Bible education.

I don't write this to flaunt my Bible knowledge.  I could recommend plenty of other people to tutor the Bible because they are more qualified than me. The question here lies in the priority of Bible education.  

Why has no parent ever come to me and said, "My son is falling behind in his Bible studies and seems to be struggling with keeping up with the Bible class curriculum.  Do you think you could help?" 

Does the idea of tutoring your children in the Bible or making sure they are not "falling behind" in the Bible even seem strange?  If so, what does that say about us and the priority we have placed on Bible education compared to secular education?  

Generally speaking, I believe we prioritize secular education more than Bible education.  And we definitely treat secular education with more seriousness and diligence than Biblical education.  (My arguments for that may need to wait until another blog post.)  Certainly if we were to ask many parents, "Which is more important for your children, Biblical education or secular education?" their answer would probably be "Biblical education, of course."  But words are one thing and actions another.

Let's throw out some food for thought.  You decide whether they apply to you or not or whether they are an indicator of Bible education being a lower priority:

  • Do you have a fund for saving for college?  Do you have a fund for saving for preaching school?
  • Are there punishments in your home for not doing school homework?  Are there punishments in your home for not doing Bible class homework?
  • Do you compare what your children are being taught in school with what the Bible says and make sure they understand the truth if there is a conflict?
  • Do you know in what areas your children struggle in school?  Do you know in what areas they struggle in Bible class?
  • Would you be willing to pay a tutor to help your children pass a class in school?   Would you be willing to pay a tutor to teach your children the Bible?
  • How much money do you spend per year on books, equipment, etc. for your child's education in school?  How much money do you spend per year on books, equipment, etc. for your child's education in the Bible?
  • Would you be appalled if your child skipped school for no real reason?  Do you skip Bible class for no real reason?
  • Do you plan your vacations around school?  Do you plan your vacations around activities at church or lectureships?
  • How many extra classes or workshops have you paid to have your child attend?  How many free online Bible classes or lectureships has your child attended?
  • Are school days filled with lots of instruction and a little bit of fun?  Are youth rallies filled with lots of fun and a little bit of Bible instruction?

I can't speak for you.  You can make comments and responses to the blog below.  But do you see a pattern emerging from the answers you gave to these questions?  What is that pattern?

Where do we place Bible education on our list of educational priorities?